GOMAEEN News Archive

These stories reflect Gulf news from June 2009 forward.

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Marine Science Institute Receives $595,626 to Study Mission-Aransas NERR Nutrients

The Gulf of Mexico Program recently announced that the Marine Science Institute will receive a $595,626 cooperative agreement for the project “Development of Pilot Nutrient Criteria for an estuary in the Western Gulf of Mexico.”
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Texas Proposes $10 Billion ‘Ike Dike’ for Storm-Surge Shield

The elected leaders of six coastal Texas counties are forming a public corporation to seek as much as $10 billion for a 100-mile (160-kilometer) network of levees, seawalls and football-field-sized floodgates that can protect the region from hurricane storm surges.
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Ocean Conservancy Report: Trash in Our Ocean has Become One of the Worst Pollution Problems

Today, Ocean Conservancy releases Trash Travels: From Our Hands to the Sea, Around the Globe, and Through Time – the only global snapshot of the marine debris problem facing wildlife, economies and marine ecosystems. Nearly 500,000 volunteers around the world combed their local beaches and waterways collecting trash and recording the data during the 24th annual International Coastal Cleanup – the largest volunteer effort of its kind. Volunteers removed and recorded 7.4 million pounds of trash in 108 countries and locations, 45 US states and the District of Columbia. The report features Ocean Conservancy’sannual Marine Debris Index – the world’s only country-by-country, state-by-state analysis of trash in our ocean and waterways. Trash Travels also shines a spotlight on the growing threat of marine debris – one of our greatest global pollution problems.
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Oceans, The Book

Oceans: Threats to the Sea and What You Can Do To Turn the Tide is being officially released on Earth Day (April 22) as a companion book to the new DisneyNature film Oceans. The book is an anthology of new essays by thirty of the most intriguing ocean thinkers and doers out there compiled by Jon Bowermaster. Jon is a six-time grantee of the National Geographic Expeditions Council and has a passion for the sea.
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Coca-Cola Dives into New Social Media Campaign During Earth Month

oca-Cola North America wants everyone to join "fins" in a new Facebook campaign to raise awareness of Earth Month and help support Ocean Conservancy, the nation's oldest and largest marine conservation organization. Through a new Facebook application, users can "oceanize" themselves into a playful underwater photo. For every person who dives into this new app, Coca-Cola will donate $1, up to a total of $200,000, to support Ocean Conservancy's marine debris program identifying policies and solutions to preventing trash from reaching our ocean and waterways. Also, through the Company's MyCokeRewards points program and a direct donation-matching program through LivePositively.com, Coca-Cola will contribute up to an additional $50,000.
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New Sand Bag Design Used in Training Exercise, A New Advance for an Old Bag

For three hours, firefighters from the Carrabelle, Lanark and Apalachicola, Florida, filled sand bags to build a forty-five foot long storm surge wall. The training exercise was conducted using newly developed bright blue and yellow high tech sand bags.
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Active 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Likely, Gulf Coasts Vulnerable

Impacts from a decade of extreme storms on the coastline of the northern Gulf of Mexico have left many coastal areas vulnerable to future storm events, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey warned today.
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Rio Grande Activists Call for Moratorium on Water Plan

As it is, according to American Rivers, the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo is one of the most endangered rivers in North America. According the World Wildlife Fund, the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo is the seventh most endangered river in the world.


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Work to start on maritime museum

Site preparation will begin this week on GulfQuest, the $52 million interactive maritime museum scheduled to open in 2011 on the waterfront at the foot of Government Street.
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Hurricane warnings to go beyond wind speed

Storms will still be categorized from 1 through 5 based on their maximum winds. But as soon as a hurricane watch goes out anywhere on the coastal Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico, local forecasters with the National Weather Service will pinpoint the biggest hazards and post specific threat maps and scales on their Web sites.
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Louisiana Oil Spill Highlights Continued Safety Concerns

Early Tuesday morning, 18000 gallons of oil spilled from a Chevron-operated pipeline into a sensitive wildlife refuge on the coast of Louisiana. The oil has so far spread to an area of about 160 square miles, covering wetlands of the Delta National Wildlife Refuge, and the Gulf of Mexico. The refuge is the wintering home to hundreds of thousands of migratory birds as well as many other critters, including already threatened species such as the America alligator and the brown pelican.

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Marine education festival returns to Pass Christian

"We try to get kids to come down, and we try to get kids to bring their parents. Together they can learn the importance of keeping our Gulf of Mexico clean and healthy," says Jennifer Buchanan, Department of Marine Resources.
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Supporters mark start of construction on Infinity Science Center

"They can actually fly one of the satellites and go to moon or go to Mars, or they can go in one of those submarines and go to the bottom of ocean," Schloegel told a crowd of state dignitaries and supporters.
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Why Are Children Rejecting Science?

Scientific organizations for years have raised the alarm over the appallingly low level of scientific literacy in the United States, but efforts to correct the situation have achieved only minimal success. Why aren't young Americans more interested in science, and why don't more of them wish to become scientists? It's obvious that science has transformed their lives -- all those smartphones, video games, PCs and TVs. Why aren't youngsters as dazzled as their elders about these contributions? Why don't they find the scientific report card more compelling? Science advocates pull their hair out over these questions.
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21 critical future NASA missions

Watching the ocean: Aquarius has been delayed over 12 months but when it launches this year it will have as its mission to measure global sea surface salinity. The satellite will provide a global view of salinity needed for climate studies, NASA said. The Aquarius / SAC-D mission being developed by NASA and the Space Agency of Argentina.

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New EPA water quality rules

But the nitrogen and phosphorus so effective at nourishing lawns is, at elevated levels, toxic for organisms living in and relying on natural water bodies.
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See what's in the sea with new South Padre boat trip

As it turns out, we saw plenty of sea creatures and learned a good bit about the ecology of the coast.
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NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson to Map Ocean Floor in Gulf of Mexico

NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson, one of the most technologically advanced hydrographic survey vessels in the world, will depart its Norfolk, Va. homeport on April 6 to conduct a five-month long effort to map the seafloor and look for hazards to navigation off the Gulf coast.


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Set out the feeders: Hummingbird migration is here

The most familiar hummer is the Ruby-throated Hummingbird. In spring, this little bird, weighing no more than 3 paper clips, puts on a little weight (a half of a paperclip’s worth) and then uses that fuel to fly nonstop over the Gulf of Mexico. This trans-Gulf flight from Central America to the coast of the United States is some 600 miles long! You can be sure that that extra dab of fat is long gone by the time a Ruby-throat makes landfall in Texas. They really need quick energy, fast! You may save their lives by providing nectar in a feeder!

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Up close with Fla.'s marine life

On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute will present MarineQuest, its annual open house where people of all ages will get to experience science through more than 60 exhibits and discussions with biologists. The free open house takes place at the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, 100 Eighth Ave. SE in St. Petersburg, and will feature both indoor and outdoor activities.
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Port of Iberia Prepares for Massive Dredging Project

Imagine having to dredge nearly 50 miles of waterway. Officials in Iberia Parish are trying to do just that, and some in Vermilion Parish are hoping to benefit.The massive project is expected to take place sometime next year starting at the Port of Iberia and ending at the Gulf of Mexico. But, a compromise that was made back in 2007 may not be on the table any longer.
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Amnesty says rights of Katrina victims violated

Amnesty International has questioned the efforts of US government and US States along the Gulf of Mexico regarding the victims of Hurricane Katrina, reporting that the human rights of those affected by the natural disaster were violated.

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Louisiana oil spill highlights need to protect Gulf from drilling


After being noticed early on Tuesday morning, the US Coast Guard, State of Louisiana and the Cypress Pipeline Company have been working for days to contain a pipeline leak that has seen 18,000 gallons of oil released.
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University of Alabama scientists study climate clues that could come from old shells

Shells left in Peruvian tombs centuries ago as offerings to the dead are providing clues to understanding the weird weather experienced this year in the Southeastern United States.



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Let's head off disaster in the Gulf

“A watershed problem, like the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, requires a watershed approach, and watersheds pay no attention to political lines,” said Whitney Broussard, a researcher at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
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Gulf region remains critical

For decades, the states of Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi and Alabama have hosted the nation’s offshore oil and gas exploration and production and will continue to play a critical role in U.S. energy security for years to come. In spite of the region’s vulnerability to storms, sea-level rise and subsidence, the infrastructure along this coast and the ability of its communities to support production and transport of energy to the rest of the nation is critical to the economic well being of our country.
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Volunteers sought to monitor turtle nests

The kick-off meeting for volunteers will be held 6 p.m. Thursday at the Gulf Shores First Baptist Church, across the street from the post office. Volunteers are needed for the following sections of beach: Fort Morgan, Laguna Key, West Beach, Gulf Shores, Gulf State Park, Orange Beach, Alabama Point, and Dauphin Island.
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We need a permanent solution

The National Flood Insurance Program — which had been temporarily renewed through Sunday, lapsed when Congress took no action to again extend it.
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Songbirds make a wondrous journey

Every time I fly over the Gulf of Mexico between the Texas coast and South America, I'm amazed that small migratory songbirds make the same journey.
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Giant, deep-sea bug surfaces in Gulf of Mexico

Huge isopod hauled from the ocean darkness after it attached itself to a remote-controlled submarine at around 8,500 feet.
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Of Special Note


DID YOU KNOW?